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Making Every Day Thanksgiving

By Robert Ringer

Like most people, I love the festive atmosphere of Thanksgiving. The spirit of this special day seems to put everyone in a good mood. But, like so many of our national holidays, I doubt that many people reflect on its purpose.

In this regard, I'd like to share with you something personal that has become a centerpiece of my life: For many years now, I have made it a ritual to think of every day as a day of thanksgiving.

I do so by beginning each morning consciously thinking about my blessings. Because everyone's glass is both half empty as well as half full, I could just as easily choose to think about my misfortunes.

Since every negative has an offsetting positive built into it, and vice versa, you always have a choice as to whether to focus on the abundance or the scarcity in your life. My firsthand experience has convinced me beyond all doubt that if you want more negatives in your life, all you need to do is think about the negatives that already exist.

Likewise, if you want more positives in your life, you should focus on the positives you already have. You'll be amazed at the number of new positives that will almost magically make their way into your life as a result of focusing on the positive side of the equation.

But the truth of the matter is that there is nothing magical at all about this phenomenon. On the contrary, it's scientific. What makes it possible is the fact that (1) all atoms are connected and (2) atoms vibrate at tremendous rates of speed.

This is why when your thoughts are positive, science works its wonders and causes those vibrating atoms in your brain to draw positive forces into your life. I feel obliged to point out here that I believe science is an extension of the Conscious Universal Power Source, or what people variously refer to as God, Yahweh, The Supreme Being, etc. And because you are always connected to this Conscious Universal Power Source, you have infinite power at your disposal.

But even if you're an atheist, I think you will find that focusing on your blessings is a cathartic way to start each day. If you choose not to give thanks to a Conscious Universal Power Source, then just be thankful in a general way for all the good "luck" you've had in your lifetime.

Sometimes, I purposely think about the negative of a situation first. Then I say to myself, "BUT, here's the offsetting positive." And I then describe it to myself. In really grim situations, it can sometimes be difficult to find positive offsets. Rest assured, however, they are always there.

I recently saw three U.S. soldiers on television who looked like they were wearing Halloween masks. All of them had their faces mangled as a result of skirmishes in Iraq, and one had already had 28 operations.

What was incredible about these three soldiers was their upbeat attitude. No bitterness, no hint of feeling sorry for themselves, no desire for sympathy. They were pleasant to a fault. And the one who'd had 28 operations on his face was the most pleasant one of all!

As I watched, I found myself thinking about how full my glass was. If I were to make up a list of all of the blessings I've had during my life -- including minor, medium, and major blessings -- such a list would be in the thousands. I don't know you personally, but I strongly suspect that your list would be just about as long as mine.

I realize that it's not easy to focus on your blessings when faced with such crises as a serious medical problem, financial upheaval, or a deteriorating marital situation. Nevertheless, it's wise to remember that the more you focus on the adversities in your life, the more adversities you are likely to get.

I don't have a double-blind study to prove it, but I can tell you from firsthand experience that being thankful for what you have every day of your life is a powerful tonic for the mind. I'm not talking about just speaking the words. I'm talking about thinking the thoughts.

Start each day by celebrating Thanksgiving, in solitude, and it will change the way you look at life. And, as they say in quantum physics, when you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change.

See Also:

A Message of Giving Thanks and Goodwill
As we prepare to give thanks this holiday season, itís critical that we donít lose sight of the many American families who are struggling to make ends meet.

About the Author:

Robert Ringer is a New York Times #1 bestselling author and host of the highly acclaimed Liberty Education Interview Series, which features interviews with top political, economic, and social leaders. His recently released work, Restoring the American Dream: The Defining Voice in the Movement for Liberty, is a clarion call to liberty-loving citizens to take back the country. Ringer has appeared on numerous national talk shows and has been the subject of feature articles in such major publications as Time, People, The Wall Street Journal, Fortune, Barron's, and The New York Times.

 

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