||    The Orthodox Faith (Dogma)    ||    Family and Youth    ||    Sermons    ||    Bible Study    ||    Devotional    ||    Spirituals    ||    Fasts & Feasts    ||    Coptics    ||    Religious Education    ||    Monasticism    ||    Seasons    ||    Missiology    ||    Ethics    ||    Ecumenical Relations    ||    Church Music    ||    Pentecost    ||    Miscellaneous    ||    Saints    ||    Church History    ||    Pope Shenouda    ||    Patrology    ||    Canon Law    ||    Lent    ||    Pastoral Theology    ||    Father Matta    ||    Bibles    ||    Iconography    ||    Liturgics    ||    Orthodox Biblical topics     ||    Orthodox articles    ||    St Chrysostom    ||   

Pentecost (50th day) and the birth of the Church

Preaching a Present-Tense Pentecost

by David Lose
Marbury E. Anderson Biblical Preaching Chair
Luther Seminary
St. Paul, MN

Preaching festivals any festival is some of the most important and most dangerous preaching we do.

Important because festivals mark the major turning points in the Christian story. They orient us toward what is central, even crucial, about the Christian faith. But also dangerous, because the nearly irresistible temptation when preaching a festival is to commemorate it. Festivals beckon us to remember God's faithful action in the past. Which is a good thing...so long as it prompts us to seek God's action among us in the present and prepare for God's action through us in the future. All too often, however, when we look back to commemorate God's action in the past our attention lingers there, and we grow nostalgic for days gone by and compare unfavorably those we currently live in. And here's where the danger lies, as there is nothing more resistant to purposeful, hopeful action in the present than nostalgia, the sentimental longing for a bygone era.

Few holidays present themselves as ripe for nostalgia as Pentecost. After all, weren't these the glory days of the church spirit-filled preaching; attentive, even miraculous listening; three thousand converted in a single day? Exactly. And what have most of us seen or done since that could possibly compare? Preaching Pentecost primarily as a remembrance of the past think big cake and candles to celebrate the church's birthday unintentionally numbs us to God's ongoing work to love, bless and redeem this world right now, right here, through us.

But Pentecost doesn't need to be about the past. In fact, I suspect that Luke, like all historians, wrote about the past in order to make sense of the present and prepare for the future. (I think he says as much in his introduction to part one of his two-volume story see Luke 1:1-4). If so, why not imitate Luke and preach Pentecost not as a nostalgic commemoration but as the means by which to anticipate and make sense of God's ongoing activity in the world.

From this point of view, the chief goal of the sermon is not to describe in detail the coming of the Spirit in tongues of flame, nor to elaborate on Peter's use of Joel in his sermon, nor even to marvel at the efficacy of his preaching. Rather, the goal is to share just enough of these details in order to ask your hearers where they see something similar happening today, to open up the biblical story of this past event in order to help them recognize God's activity among and through them in the present.

Some years ago, I did just that...completely by accident. A month earlier we had successfully completed the most ambitious capital campaign in the congregation's history. In my Pentecost sermon, I said that I had seen Pentecost happen on the "commitment Sunday" that culminated that campaign. It was an offhand remark. Don't get me wrong: I meant what I said, but it wasn't the center of the sermon. But you wouldn't have known that by the reaction it aroused. More persons commented on that single line than on anything I'd preached in quite some time. The most frequent remark was, "You helped me experience Pentecost as something that is happening today, not just long ago."

Notice that what happened in our congregation was not the same as what happened two thousand years before. Rather, we were discerning a pattern of God's activity and linking how God acted in the past with how God was still at work in and through us. The details weren't important the pattern of an active God at work through God's people was what counted.

Last week I described what I think is the great challenge of this generation of church leaders: to open the biblical story so that people hear and feel it speaking into the present. Pentecost is one of those "make or break" days in this effort. To the degree that we preach Pentecost as a commemoration of a wonderful day in the church's past, we have the opportunity of kindling warm, nostalgic feelings about one of the church's festivals...for those who still care about such things. But to the degree that we preach Pentecost as a promise of God's ongoing activity and as a clue to discerning how God is using us just as surely as God used Peter, we have the potential for making this portion of the biblical witness both vital and useful.

Most of our hearers are so much more accustomed to commemoration than anticipation that we may need to help them by naming where we see Pentecost happening around us. But anticipating God's work ends us being so much more fun than commemorating it that I promise you it won't take them all that long to try it for themselves. So show them, invite them, and then send them to look for God's ongoing Pentecost. Thank you for this, Working Preacher, and for all that you do.

See Also:

Pentecost Paradoxes
by David Lose

What would you say if I suggested that we regularly misinterpret Pentecost? Actually, not just misinterpret it a little, but generally get Pentecost completely backwards. Intrigued? Curious? Offended? Read on.

What is the relevance of Pentecost in our Church?
by Fr. Saji K. Mathew

When we think about Holy Spirit the two factors which rush to our mind are Love (agape) and Cooperation (Selfless Unity with identity intact). Both these things are found in perfection in the Holy Trinity. Holy Trinity is the model and source of encouragement for humanity in the contemporary world. We should derive energy to grow in spirit from that divine source.

What the Holy Spirit Really Looks Like
by David Lose

Have you ever seen the Holy Spirit? (No, that's not a trick question.) Seriously, then: have you seen the Spirit? No, of course not. The best we get in the Bible are descriptions of tongues of flame (Acts 2) or a freely blowing breeze (John 3). I think that's what makes preaching on or for that matter even talking about the Holy Spirit so difficult. We don't know what the Spirit looks like.

>

 

||    The Orthodox Faith (Dogma)    ||    Family and Youth    ||    Sermons    ||    Bible Study    ||    Devotional    ||    Spirituals    ||    Fasts & Feasts    ||    Coptics    ||    Religious Education    ||    Monasticism    ||    Seasons    ||    Missiology    ||    Ethics    ||    Ecumenical Relations    ||    Church Music    ||    Pentecost    ||    Miscellaneous    ||    Saints    ||    Church History    ||    Pope Shenouda    ||    Patrology    ||    Canon Law    ||    Lent    ||    Pastoral Theology    ||    Father Matta    ||    Bibles    ||    Iconography    ||    Liturgics    ||    Orthodox Biblical topics     ||    Orthodox articles    ||    St Chrysostom    ||   

||    Bible Study    ||    Biblical topics    ||    Bibles    ||    Orthodox Bible Study    ||    Coptic Bible Study    ||    King James Version    ||    New King James Version    ||    Scripture Nuggets    ||    Index of the Parables and Metaphors of Jesus    ||    Index of the Miracles of Jesus    ||    Index of Doctrines    ||    Index of Charts    ||    Index of Maps    ||    Index of Topical Essays    ||    Index of Word Studies    ||    Colored Maps    ||    Index of Biblical names Notes    ||    Old Testament activities for Sunday School kids    ||    New Testament activities for Sunday School kids    ||    Bible Illustrations    ||    Bible short notes

||    Pope Shenouda    ||    Father Matta    ||    Bishop Mattaous    ||    Fr. Tadros Malaty    ||    Bishop Moussa    ||    Bishop Alexander    ||    Habib Gerguis    ||    Bishop Angealos    ||    Metropolitan Bishoy    ||

||    Prayer of the First Hour    ||    Third Hour    ||    Sixth Hour    ||    Ninth Hour    ||    Vespers (Eleventh Hour)    ||    Compline (Twelfth Hour)    ||    The First Watch of the midnight prayers    ||    The Second Watch of the midnight prayers    ||    The Third Watch of the midnight prayers    ||    The Prayer of the Veil    ||    Various Prayers from the Agbia    ||    Synaxarium